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Validation of a new olfactory test for Chinese Parkinson’s disease patients

  • Ming Cao
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurobiology and Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053, China
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  • Ning Wang
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurobiology and Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053, China
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  • Peng Zheng
    Affiliations
    Center of Research and Development of Jiangsu Parkinsense Biotech Co. Ltd. Jiangsu, Taizhou 225300, China
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  • ZhuQin Gu
    Affiliations
    National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Disorders, Parkinson Disease Center of Beijing Institute of Brain Disorders, Beijing Key Laboratory on Parkinson’s Disease, Beijing 100053, China
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  • Piu Chan
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, 45 Changchun Street, 100053 Beijing, China.
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurobiology and Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053, China

    National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Disorders, Parkinson Disease Center of Beijing Institute of Brain Disorders, Beijing Key Laboratory on Parkinson’s Disease, Beijing 100053, China
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Published:April 21, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2020.04.068

      Highlights

      • The China's National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) approved new olfactory test is reported for the first time.
      • The current study sought to investigate the efficacy of a new olfactory test designed for Chinese PD patients and compare it with the most commonly used olfactory test, B-SIT.
      • In clinical practice, neurologists routinely ask subjects if they feel smell loss and make the diagnosis base on the reply of subjects in China.
      • However, our findings suggest that self-reported hyposmia might be unreliable in the diagnosis of PD.

      Abstract

      Introduction

      Hyposmia is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and has been used to assist PD diagnosis and early screening of prodromal patients. Although the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) is the most commonly used olfactory test, its utility was limited by the culture difference in recognition of the smells included in the test. We have developed a new modified B-SIT test for Chinese (B-SITC), and validated and compare it with B-SIT in Chinese PD patients.

      Methods

      From 2015 to 2018, PD patients were recruited from the Movement Disorder Clinic of Xuanwu Hospital and healthy controls were recruited from the Beijing Longitudinal Study on Aging Cohort II. The two olfactory tests were used in healthy volunteers and PD patients.

      Results

      A total of 428 subjects participated in the study: 211 healthy controls and 217 PD patients. The average B-SIT and B-SITC scores were significantly different between control and PD groups (B-SIT, 9.18 ± 1.94 vs. 6.90 ± 2.44, P = 0.0001; B-SITC, 8.60 ± 1.93 vs. 5.91 ± 2.21, P = 0.0001). The B-SITC had good sensitivity (73.1%), specificity (76.8%), positive predictive value (76.8%), and negative predictive value (73.1%) for the diagnosis of Chinese PD, and the area under the curve (AUC) value was greater for the B-SITC than for the B-SIT (0.838 vs. 0.761).

      Conclusions

      The B-SITC is useful for the clinical assessment of olfactory function in Chinese PD patients.

      Keywords

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