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How safe is Bubble Soccer?

Published:September 10, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2016.08.007

      Highlights

      • Bubble Soccer is a presumably safe sport played with full-body protection.
      • We report the 1st case of spinal cord injury in a 16 year-old playing Bubble Soccer.
      • Increased axial load and absence of superior protection are factors in injury.
      • Strict regulations should be considered for this increasingly popular sport.

      Abstract

      Traumatic neurologic injury in contact sports is a rare but serious consequence for its players. These injuries are most commonly associated with high-impact collisions, for example in football, but are found in a wide variety of sports. In an attempt to minimize these injuries, sports are trying to increase safety by adding protection for participants. Most recently is the seemingly ‘safe’ sport of Bubble Soccer, which attempts to protect its players with inflatable plastic bubbles. We report a case of a 16-year-old male sustaining a cervical spine burst fracture with incomplete spinal cord injury while playing Bubble Soccer. To our knowledge, this is the first serious neurological injury reported in the sport.

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